Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century.

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  • Additional Information
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      713290 Other Gambling Industries
      323117 Books Printing
    • Abstract:
      This essay explores the emergence and significance of printed game boards in Rome at the turn of the seventeenth century. These objects constitute an important and overlooked visual and material aspect of a pervasive culture of gaming that engrossed a huge range of the populace: both the rich and the poor; men and women; the educated and the illiterate. Printed game boards not only served to entertain, but also mirrored and reified deeper social and moral concerns about gambling and leisure, a tension between the prescribed morality of the legal sanctions, decrees, and censures associated with the Counter-Reformation, and the everyday games common both in courtly leisure and play on the street and in the tavern. Visually manifesting a dual understanding of games as both ludic and mimetic, printed game boards enacted the ontology of life’s journey for early modern players, from the courtly, to the religious, and the quotidian. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Art History is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • ISSN:
      0141-6790
    • Accession Number:
      10.1111/1467-8365.12452
    • Accession Number:
      136579317
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WOOD, K. Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century. Art History, [s. l.], v. 42, n. 3, p. 450–481, 2019. DOI 10.1111/1467-8365.12452. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=136579317. Acesso em: 22 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Wood K. Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century. Art History. 2019;42(3):450-481. doi:10.1111/1467-8365.12452
    • APA:
      Wood, K. (2019). Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century. Art History, 42(3), 450–481. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8365.12452
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Wood, Kelli. 2019. “Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century.” Art History 42 (3): 450–81. doi:10.1111/1467-8365.12452.
    • Harvard:
      Wood, K. (2019) ‘Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century’, Art History, 42(3), pp. 450–481. doi: 10.1111/1467-8365.12452.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Wood, K 2019, ‘Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century’, Art History, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 450–481, viewed 22 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Wood, Kelli. “Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century.” Art History, vol. 42, no. 3, June 2019, pp. 450–481. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/1467-8365.12452.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Wood, Kelli. “Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century.” Art History 42, no. 3 (June 2019): 450–81. doi:10.1111/1467-8365.12452.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Wood K. Chancing It: Print, Play, and Gambling Games at the End of the Sixteenth Century. Art History [Internet]. 2019 Jun [cited 2020 Oct 22];42(3):450–81. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=136579317