Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Albert Moll
      plagiarism
      priority claims
      psychoanalysis
      sexology
      sexual theory
      Sigmund Freud
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      This article explores the antagonism between Sigmund Freud and the German neurologist and sexologist Albert Moll. When Moll, in 1908, published a book about the sexuality of children, Freud, without any grounds, accused him of plagiarism. In fact, Moll had reason to suspect Freud of plagiarism since there are many parallels between Freud's Drei Abhandlungen zur Sexualtheorie and Moll's Untersuchungen über die Libido sexualis. Freud had read this book carefully, but hardly paid tribute to Moll's innovative thinking about sexuality. A comparison between the two works casts doubt on Freud's claim that his work was a revolutionary breakthrough. Freud's course of action raises questions about his integrity. The article also critically addresses earlier evaluations of the clash. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of History of Psychiatry is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Maastricht University, Netherlands
    • ISSN:
      0957-154X
    • Accession Number:
      10.1177/0957154X20922130
    • Accession Number:
      144496439
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      OOSTERHUIS, H. Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes. History of Psychiatry, [s. l.], v. 31, n. 3, p. 294–310, 2020. DOI 10.1177/0957154X20922130. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=144496439. Acesso em: 27 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Oosterhuis H. Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes. History of Psychiatry. 2020;31(3):294-310. doi:10.1177/0957154X20922130
    • APA:
      Oosterhuis, H. (2020). Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes. History of Psychiatry, 31(3), 294–310. https://doi.org/10.1177/0957154X20922130
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Oosterhuis, Harry. 2020. “Freud and Albert Moll: How Kindred Spirits Became Bitter Foes.” History of Psychiatry 31 (3): 294–310. doi:10.1177/0957154X20922130.
    • Harvard:
      Oosterhuis, H. (2020) ‘Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes’, History of Psychiatry, 31(3), pp. 294–310. doi: 10.1177/0957154X20922130.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Oosterhuis, H 2020, ‘Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes’, History of Psychiatry, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 294–310, viewed 27 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Oosterhuis, Harry. “Freud and Albert Moll: How Kindred Spirits Became Bitter Foes.” History of Psychiatry, vol. 31, no. 3, Sept. 2020, pp. 294–310. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1177/0957154X20922130.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Oosterhuis, Harry. “Freud and Albert Moll: How Kindred Spirits Became Bitter Foes.” History of Psychiatry 31, no. 3 (September 2020): 294–310. doi:10.1177/0957154X20922130.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Oosterhuis H. Freud and Albert Moll: how kindred spirits became bitter foes. History of Psychiatry [Internet]. 2020 Sep [cited 2020 Nov 27];31(3):294–310. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=144496439