States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Citizenship
      Health care access
      Immigration
    • Abstract:
      Background: In the last thirty years, major shifts in immigrant policy at national and state levels has heightened boundaries among citizens, permanent residents, and those with other statuses. While there is mounting evidence that citizenship influences immigrant health care inequities, there has been less focus on how policies that reinforce citizenship stratification may shape the extent of these inequities. We examine the extent to which the relationship between citizenship and health care inequities is moderated by state-level criminalization policies.Methods: Taking a comparative approach, we assess how distinct criminalization policy contexts across US states are associated with inequitable access to care by citizenship status. Utilizing a data set with state-level measures of criminalization policy and individual-level measures of having a usual source of care from the National Health Interview Survey, we use mixed-effects logistic regression models to assess the extent to which inequities in health care access between noncitizens and US born citizens vary depending on states' criminalization policies.Results: Each additional criminalization policy was associated with a lower odds that noncitizens in the state had a usual source of care, compared to US born citizens.Conclusion: Criminalization policies shape the construction of citizenship stratification across geography, such as exacerbating inequities in health care access by citizenship. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1Department of Public Health, School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts, University of California, Merced, USA
      2Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
    • Full Text Word Count:
      6306
    • ISSN:
      1471-2458
    • Accession Number:
      10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4
    • Accession Number:
      146431338
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      YOUNG, M.-E. D. T.; BELTRÁN-SÁNCHEZ, H.; WALLACE, S. P. States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens. BMC Public Health, [s. l.], v. 20, n. 1, p. 1–10, 2020. DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=146431338. Acesso em: 1 dez. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Young M-EDT, Beltrán-Sánchez H, Wallace SP. States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens. BMC Public Health. 2020;20(1):1-10. doi:10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4
    • APA:
      Young, M.-E. D. T., Beltrán-Sánchez, H., & Wallace, S. P. (2020). States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens. BMC Public Health, 20(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Young, Maria-Elena De Trinidad, Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, and Steven P. Wallace. 2020. “States with Fewer Criminalizing Immigrant Policies Have Smaller Health Care Inequities between Citizens and Noncitizens.” BMC Public Health 20 (1): 1–10. doi:10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4.
    • Harvard:
      Young, M.-E. D. T., Beltrán-Sánchez, H. and Wallace, S. P. (2020) ‘States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens’, BMC Public Health, 20(1), pp. 1–10. doi: 10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Young, M-EDT, Beltrán-Sánchez, H & Wallace, SP 2020, ‘States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens’, BMC Public Health, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1–10, viewed 1 December 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Young, Maria-Elena De Trinidad, et al. “States with Fewer Criminalizing Immigrant Policies Have Smaller Health Care Inequities between Citizens and Noncitizens.” BMC Public Health, vol. 20, no. 1, Oct. 2020, pp. 1–10. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Young, Maria-Elena De Trinidad, Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, and Steven P. Wallace. “States with Fewer Criminalizing Immigrant Policies Have Smaller Health Care Inequities between Citizens and Noncitizens.” BMC Public Health 20, no. 1 (October 15, 2020): 1–10. doi:10.1186/s12889-020-09525-4.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Young M-EDT, Beltrán-Sánchez H, Wallace SP. States with fewer criminalizing immigrant policies have smaller health care inequities between citizens and noncitizens. BMC Public Health [Internet]. 2020 Oct 15 [cited 2020 Dec 1];20(1):1–10. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=146431338