William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      William S. Burroughs thematized Maya priests as gods of death in texts from "Junky" to "The Job." "Ah Pook Is Here" takes its title from a Maya god of the dead, Ah Puch. Burroughs had many valid reasons to cast Maya priests as emblems of control and death even though he contradicted the mid-century archaeological view of the Maya as a benevolent theocracy. In recognizing the violence in Maya culture Burroughs was remarkably prescient. In the mid-1980s, however, came a radical change in archaeological interpretation which contradicts many of Burroughs's Maya appropriations: priests have all but disappeared from the archaeological record to be replaced (ironically) by scribes, the codices are not books of the dead, and hieroglyphic "picture" writing can not circumvent the Word virus. Burroughs's centipede symbol recalls the Senders of Interzone who, like his Maya priests, turn into giant centipedes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of College Literature is the property of Johns Hopkins University Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • ISSN:
      0093-3139
    • Accession Number:
      10.1353/lit.2008.0009
    • Accession Number:
      28047156
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WILD, P. H. William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology. College Literature, [s. l.], v. 35, n. 1, p. 38–57, 2008. DOI 10.1353/lit.2008.0009. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=28047156. Acesso em: 3 dez. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Wild PH. William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology. College Literature. 2008;35(1):38-57. doi:10.1353/lit.2008.0009
    • APA:
      Wild, P. H. (2008). William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology. College Literature, 35(1), 38–57. https://doi.org/10.1353/lit.2008.0009
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Wild, Paul H. 2008. “William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology.” College Literature 35 (1): 38–57. doi:10.1353/lit.2008.0009.
    • Harvard:
      Wild, P. H. (2008) ‘William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology’, College Literature, 35(1), pp. 38–57. doi: 10.1353/lit.2008.0009.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Wild, PH 2008, ‘William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology’, College Literature, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 38–57, viewed 3 December 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Wild, Paul H. “William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology.” College Literature, vol. 35, no. 1, Winter 2008, pp. 38–57. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1353/lit.2008.0009.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Wild, Paul H. “William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology.” College Literature 35, no. 1 (Winter 2008): 38–57. doi:10.1353/lit.2008.0009.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Wild PH. William S. Burroughs and the Maya Gods of Death: The Uses of Archaeology. College Literature [Internet]. 2008 Winter [cited 2020 Dec 3];35(1):38–57. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=28047156