Homer's "Odyssey": Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      In 1950 Philip Whaley Harsh suggested that Penelope in book 19 of the "Odyssey" first suspected that the stranger in the palace was her husband. The standard interpretation of Penelope's recognition of Odysseus would have us believe that she does not recognize him until book 23. The time of Penelope's recognition, however, can only be determined in how the "Odyssey" is read. Is the "Odyssey" a straightforward story or does it have subtlety and sophistication that requires reading between the lines to determine the actors' motives for their actions? Why does Penelope suddenly desire to show herself before her hated suitors in book 18? Why does Penelope fail to ask the stranger what he knows about her husband's whereabouts in book 19 when that was the purpose of the interview? Why does she ask the stranger to interpret a dream that she supposedly had when the dream is self-interpreting? Why does she decide to hold a contest with the bow with her as the marriage prize when she has been told that her husband is near? These are some of the questions the present paper attempts to answer while suggesting that Penelope suspects that her husband may have returned in disguise as early as book 17 and confirms his identity in book 19. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • ISSN:
      0093-3139
    • Accession Number:
      10.1353/lit.2011.0012
    • Accession Number:
      59922427
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      VLAHOS, J. B. Homer’s “Odyssey”: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition. College Literature, [s. l.], v. 38, n. 2, p. 1–75, 2011. DOI 10.1353/lit.2011.0012. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=59922427. Acesso em: 28 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Vlahos JB. Homer’s “Odyssey”: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition. College Literature. 2011;38(2):1-75. doi:10.1353/lit.2011.0012
    • APA:
      Vlahos, J. B. (2011). Homer’s “Odyssey”: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition. College Literature, 38(2), 1–75. https://doi.org/10.1353/lit.2011.0012
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Vlahos, John B. 2011. “Homer’s ‘Odyssey’: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition.” College Literature 38 (2): 1–75. doi:10.1353/lit.2011.0012.
    • Harvard:
      Vlahos, J. B. (2011) ‘Homer’s “Odyssey”: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition’, College Literature, 38(2), pp. 1–75. doi: 10.1353/lit.2011.0012.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Vlahos, JB 2011, ‘Homer’s “Odyssey”: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition’, College Literature, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 1–75, viewed 28 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Vlahos, John B. “Homer’s ‘Odyssey’: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition.” College Literature, vol. 38, no. 2, Spring 2011, pp. 1–75. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1353/lit.2011.0012.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Vlahos, John B. “Homer’s ‘Odyssey’: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition.” College Literature 38, no. 2 (Spring 2011): 1–75. doi:10.1353/lit.2011.0012.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Vlahos JB. Homer’s “Odyssey”: Penelope and The Case for Early Recognition. College Literature [Internet]. 2011 Spring [cited 2020 Nov 28];38(2):1–75. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=59922427