Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      Rhodes University, Institute for the Study of English in Africa
    • Publication Date:
      2019
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      People of different cultures have celebrated the railways--the trains, those who work on them and those who travel in them--in poetry and song. The French cherish lapoesie ferroviaire, and even [...]
      This article analyses a selection of South African English and Afrikaans humorous and satirical poems and songs about the railways. They include a folksong, 'The Kimberley Train', which dates back to the earliest expansion of the railways to the interior, and poems and songs from the 1960s to the early 90s. While Hugh Masekela raged at the condition of migrant miners, the target of the satire by English- and Afrikaans-speaking writers was the Afrikaner nation, its culture and history. Four of the poems are ballads in the heroic tradition. The characters featured are working-class Afrikaners, and the diction employed is a colloquial South African dialect consisting of modern slang, mixed English and Afrikaans, and Fanakalo. A common method of the humour and satire exploits the connotations of personal and place names. KEY WORDS Railway poems, railway songs, South African satire, South African poetry, South African folksongs, South African English dialect
    • ISSN:
      0376-8902
    • Accession Number:
      10.4314/eia.v46i2.6
    • Rights:
      Copyright 2019 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
      COPYRIGHT 2019 Rhodes University, Institute for the Study of English in Africa
    • Accession Number:
      edsgcl.601907159
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      JENKINS, E. Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs. English in Africa, [s. l.], n. 2, p. 103, 2019. DOI 10.4314/eia.v46i2.6. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsgao&AN=edsgcl.601907159. Acesso em: 26 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Jenkins E. Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs. English in Africa. 2019;(2):103. doi:10.4314/eia.v46i2.6.
    • APA:
      Jenkins, E. (2019). Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs. English in Africa, 2, 103. https://doi.org/10.4314/eia.v46i2.6
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Jenkins, Elwyn. 2019. “Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in Some South African Railway Poems and Songs.” English in Africa, no. 2: 103. doi:10.4314/eia.v46i2.6.
    • Harvard:
      Jenkins, E. (2019) ‘Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs’, English in Africa, (2), p. 103. doi: 10.4314/eia.v46i2.6.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Jenkins, E 2019, ‘Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs’, English in Africa, no. 2, p. 103, viewed 26 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Jenkins, Elwyn. “Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in Some South African Railway Poems and Songs.” English in Africa, no. 2, 2019, p. 103. EBSCOhost, doi:10.4314/eia.v46i2.6.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Jenkins, Elwyn. “Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in Some South African Railway Poems and Songs.” English in Africa, no. 2 (2019): 103. doi:10.4314/eia.v46i2.6.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Jenkins E. Folksong and Ballad as Social Comment in some South African Railway Poems and Songs. English in Africa [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2020 May 26];(2):103. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsgao&AN=edsgcl.601907159